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WE LOVE JAM STUDIOS

Project Type - Interior architecture in a heritage context

Location - Walsh Bay, Sydney

Photos - Prue Ruscoe

Make some noise for We Love Jam Studios, a project to create a dynamic recording and audio production space that could seamlessly transform into an intimate gig setting. However, this architecture and design journey came with unique challenges, starting with the heritage listing of the former wool store site, which also had no natural daylight.

 

Creative Constraints: Heritage Listing and Lighting

 

Heritage listings require a careful design approach. This old, beautiful building urged me to tread lightly within its historic framework, respecting the space and its past, yet the absence of windows and no natural light was a significant hurdle. My solution was a gentle yet considered design that effortlessly mixed heritage preservation with modern functionality.

 

A Minimalist Heritage Intervention

 

To respect the heritage aspect, I suspended the audio studios and soundproof rooms within the existing framework. This not only minimised the impact on the historic structure but also created a visually striking contrast between old and new.

 

To overcome the absence of natural daylight, I mimicked an indoor and outdoor experience by creating strongly defined public and private areas accentuated by a dynamic lighting scheme.

 

Lighting Choreography: Tuning Atmospheres

 

The soul of We Love Jam Studio lies in its clever lighting choreography. Bright, vibrant lighting in the 'public' zones creates an illusion of natural daylight streaming in. In contrast, the 'private' spaces are adorned with softer, more intimate lighting, crafting pockets of evening cosiness within the studio's depths.

 

A Masterpiece of Heritage and Creativity

 

We Love Jam Studios is a symphony of heritage preservation and creative ingenuity. Through the artful integration of suspended studios, immersive design, and dynamic lighting, the constraints of this unique site became wonderful opportunities.

Alexandra Mowday
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